Event Title

Poster Session

Presenter Information

Poster Session

Location

UC Panorama Ballroom

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

9-6-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

9-6-2016 6:30 PM

Description

Create and Share Your Own Video Content - Anthony Persico, YouTube

My idea is for an infographic‐like poster which shares best practices for teachers interesting in creating their own high‐quality content and sharing it on social platforms like YouTube.

Flipping Genetics - Lacy Cleveland, Nissa Yestness, and Judy Leatherman, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will present methods used in flipping Genetics, as well as student attitudes and learning outcomes.

Investigating Student Motivation and Expectation on Attitude toward Flipped Learning - Tahni Alruwaili, University of Northern Colorado

Flipped learning is an innovative approach to classroom structure and delivery of new information to students in which classroom time is utilized for problem solving and discussion instead of lectures, which are provided as videos to be watched outside of class. However, many educators are reluctant to incorporate flipped learning as a strategy in their teaching without more information about its effectiveness and ways to successfully implement flipped learning to promote student success. The current study investigated the effects of motivation and expectation on student attitude toward flipped learning in an effort to provide more information to educators regarding flipped learning and successful incorporation of this strategy into teaching practices. A survey was given to students in two classes at a Midwestern university to investigate their perceptions and beliefs about flipped learning. Findings from regression analysis and ANOVA implicated motivation as a key factor on student attitude about flipped learning. Suggestions for future research and applying these findings were provided.

Flipping in the Large Biology Classroom - Sue Ellen DeChenne, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will present strategies I have implemented to flip a large biology classroom. I have about 100 students in one section of General Microbiology and have several strategies that I use when flipping such a large class. I would like to share those strategies with others who are interested in the logistics of flipping in a large class.

Creating a Student‐Centered Learning Experience in the Large Introductory Biology Classroom - James Haughian, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will discuss instructor experiences and student performance after flipping a large (>70 student) Introductory Biology course for non‐majors. Student assessment scores were tracked across multiple semesters allowing a comparison between a conventional lecture and flipped classroom approach.

Flipped Learning in Higher Education - Sara Movahedazarhouligh and Robin Brewer, University of Northern Colorado

Flipped Learning is particularly well‐suited to higher education settings for a variety of reasons to develop vital skills needed in the 21st century, including critical thinking, creativity, communications, and collaboration. There are a handful of studies that explicitly compare flipped and traditional face‐to‐face course structures in an actual classroom. Those that have demonstrate an achievement advantage for students in the flipped classroom, much like what is found with blended learning more generally. This includes studies that demonstrate students' perceptions and feedback on flipped learning and flipped classrooms, in which most of the students expressed their satisfaction with learning environment, constant and positive interactions with teachers and peers during class time, more access to course materials and instruction; are more able to work at their own pace, more engagement in collaborative decision making with other students and in critical thinking and problem solving; and that the teachers were more likely to take into account their interests, strengths, and weaknesses. Majority of the findings reported that flipped classes had a positive impact on students' performance and that majority of students outperformed their peers in non‐flipped traditional classes and scored higher which resulted in an appreciably reported improvement in learning. This poster reviews the literature and research that offer evidence‐based implications for flipped learning practice in higher education. The purpose of this poster is to help higher education instructors maximize the learning experience, make data‐driven decisions, and effectively shift accountability for learning in ways that improve learners outcomes.

Flip The Page: Reinvigorating Literature Through Flipped Learning - Eric James Beyer and Jonathan Mark Day, MEF University

After designing and running a second‐language literature course in 2015 and 2016, we continue exploring ways of increasing student‐centered learning. Using digital platforms, we have made strides in increasing student autonomy, ownership, and preparedness. Analysis of data collected will enable us to further achieve our goals of a Flipped course.

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Jun 9th, 5:30 PM Jun 9th, 6:30 PM

Poster Session

UC Panorama Ballroom

Create and Share Your Own Video Content - Anthony Persico, YouTube

My idea is for an infographic‐like poster which shares best practices for teachers interesting in creating their own high‐quality content and sharing it on social platforms like YouTube.

Flipping Genetics - Lacy Cleveland, Nissa Yestness, and Judy Leatherman, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will present methods used in flipping Genetics, as well as student attitudes and learning outcomes.

Investigating Student Motivation and Expectation on Attitude toward Flipped Learning - Tahni Alruwaili, University of Northern Colorado

Flipped learning is an innovative approach to classroom structure and delivery of new information to students in which classroom time is utilized for problem solving and discussion instead of lectures, which are provided as videos to be watched outside of class. However, many educators are reluctant to incorporate flipped learning as a strategy in their teaching without more information about its effectiveness and ways to successfully implement flipped learning to promote student success. The current study investigated the effects of motivation and expectation on student attitude toward flipped learning in an effort to provide more information to educators regarding flipped learning and successful incorporation of this strategy into teaching practices. A survey was given to students in two classes at a Midwestern university to investigate their perceptions and beliefs about flipped learning. Findings from regression analysis and ANOVA implicated motivation as a key factor on student attitude about flipped learning. Suggestions for future research and applying these findings were provided.

Flipping in the Large Biology Classroom - Sue Ellen DeChenne, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will present strategies I have implemented to flip a large biology classroom. I have about 100 students in one section of General Microbiology and have several strategies that I use when flipping such a large class. I would like to share those strategies with others who are interested in the logistics of flipping in a large class.

Creating a Student‐Centered Learning Experience in the Large Introductory Biology Classroom - James Haughian, University of Northern Colorado

This poster will discuss instructor experiences and student performance after flipping a large (>70 student) Introductory Biology course for non‐majors. Student assessment scores were tracked across multiple semesters allowing a comparison between a conventional lecture and flipped classroom approach.

Flipped Learning in Higher Education - Sara Movahedazarhouligh and Robin Brewer, University of Northern Colorado

Flipped Learning is particularly well‐suited to higher education settings for a variety of reasons to develop vital skills needed in the 21st century, including critical thinking, creativity, communications, and collaboration. There are a handful of studies that explicitly compare flipped and traditional face‐to‐face course structures in an actual classroom. Those that have demonstrate an achievement advantage for students in the flipped classroom, much like what is found with blended learning more generally. This includes studies that demonstrate students' perceptions and feedback on flipped learning and flipped classrooms, in which most of the students expressed their satisfaction with learning environment, constant and positive interactions with teachers and peers during class time, more access to course materials and instruction; are more able to work at their own pace, more engagement in collaborative decision making with other students and in critical thinking and problem solving; and that the teachers were more likely to take into account their interests, strengths, and weaknesses. Majority of the findings reported that flipped classes had a positive impact on students' performance and that majority of students outperformed their peers in non‐flipped traditional classes and scored higher which resulted in an appreciably reported improvement in learning. This poster reviews the literature and research that offer evidence‐based implications for flipped learning practice in higher education. The purpose of this poster is to help higher education instructors maximize the learning experience, make data‐driven decisions, and effectively shift accountability for learning in ways that improve learners outcomes.

Flip The Page: Reinvigorating Literature Through Flipped Learning - Eric James Beyer and Jonathan Mark Day, MEF University

After designing and running a second‐language literature course in 2015 and 2016, we continue exploring ways of increasing student‐centered learning. Using digital platforms, we have made strides in increasing student autonomy, ownership, and preparedness. Analysis of data collected will enable us to further achieve our goals of a Flipped course.