Advisor

Slykhuis, David A.

Committee Member

Williams, Mia Kim

Committee Member

Farber, Matthew D.

Committee Member

Pugh, Kevin J.

Department

College of Education and Behavioral Sciences; Technology Innovation and Pedagogy

Institution

University of Northern Colorado

Type of Resources

Text

Place of Publication

Greeley, (Colo.)

Publisher

University of Northern Colorado

Date Created

12-2020

Extent

229 pages

Digital Origin

Born digital

Abstract

This e-Delphi study explored learning approaches, as defined by Generation Z (Gen Z) learners, in online academic settings and nonacademic settings. It also considered differences between the two panels (38 participants in each panel, representing 39 states) of learners (Academic and Nonacademic) and compared current literature-supported best practices to the learning approaches generated by participants in this study. The Academic panel participants reached consensus on six of the 56 learning approaches: (a) completing course material; (b) rely on self; (c) projects that I can choose what to do and learn material by myself; (d) search Internet; (e) ask expert; and (f) work/discuss with others in class. Additionally, two themes emerged: (1) Guidance with subthemes (a) clear expectations and (b) ask to get a response and (2) Reliance on Self. Thematic analysis of the Academic panel participant data identified two themes: (1) Guidance with subthemes (a) clear expectations and (b) ask to get a response and (2) Reliance on Self. The Nonacademic panel participants reached consensus on 10 of the 37 learning approaches: (a) search online; (b) search for online resources, which are detailed; (c) very detailed, written instructions; (d) try to learn a new skill by self; (e) projects that I can choose what to do and learn material by self; (f) visual examples of finished projects; (g) videos that show me how to do the project; (h) ask expert; (i) ask in social media group; and (j) watch video. Thematic analysis of the Nonacademic panel participant data identified two themes (1) Recommendations and (2) Search Online. The driving learning approach for the Academic panel participants was identified as seeking a guide, while the Nonacademic panel participants sought recommendations to aid them in the learning process. This study added to the limited literature on Gen Z, and offered suggestions for educators to enhance Gen Z learning experiences. Key words: Generation Z, Gen Z, learning approaches, online learning, deep learning, deep learning for transfer/application outcomes, higher education, pedagogical practices, The Delphi method.

Degree type

EdD

Degree Name

Doctoral

Local Identifiers

Mellman_unco_0161D_10887.pdf

Rights Statement

Copyright is held by the author.

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