Advisor

Todd Allen

Type of Resources

Article

Date Created

12-5-203

Digital Origin

Born digital

Abstract

This research study examined how stress and anxiety affects female undergraduate college students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in having academic success. In total, 105 female and 38 male undergraduate students completed the questionnaire regarding demographics, ADHD, anxiety, stress, academic success, and current symptoms of behavior and ability to function within school related activities. Research has shown that most college students with ADHD tend to have more anxiety and stress throughout their undergraduate and graduate years, most prominently in females. Little research has gone into understanding how ADHD and academic success go together with accomplishing goals in life. The Academic Success Inventory for College Students (ASICS) (Prevatt et al., 2011), has rarely been used in other research papers that do not address ADHD (Welles, 2010; Johnson, 2021; Orchanli et al., 2021). As a result, in my research, the Academic Success Inventory for College Students had no relationship with the Perceived Stress Scale and Beck’s Anxiety Inventory. Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale and Current Symptoms Rating Scale had a weak negative relationship with the Academic Success Inventory for College Students. Furthermore, this negative relationship with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale suggests that academic success among female undergraduate college students who associate with having ADHD is affected a minor amount when it comes to succeeding in school. Stress and anxiety had no relationship with the Academic Success Inventory for College Students showing that stress and anxiety lacked a correlation with academic success among female undergraduate college students.

Degree Name

Bachelor

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