Hayward, Reid

Committee Member

Hydock, David S. (David Scott)


Exercise Science


University of Northern Colorado

Type of Resources


Place of Publication

Greeley (Colo.)


University of Northern Colorado

Date Created



61 pages

Digital Origin

Born digital


Chemotherapy is one of the most effective cancer treatments to date; however, it has the potential to produce debilitating life-long side effects. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a side effect caused by toxic chemotherapy agents that deteriorate the peripheral nerves of the body. Research has suggested that aerobic and strength training may be able to alleviate some of the symptoms associated with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Some of the benefits of both aerobic and strength training include increasing blood and nutrient flow to the peripheral nerves, which could help restore sensation and alleviate the some symptoms of chemotherapyinduced peripheral neuropathy. However, to our knowledge, there is little research evaluating the effects of an aerobic and strength-training intervention on chemotherapyinduced peripheral neuropathy. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 12-week aerobic and strength training intervention on the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Methods: Ten participants (aged 48-76) participated in a 12-week exercise intervention and completed a pre-, mid-, and post- 4.17/1g Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test and 5.07/10g Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test. A comprehensive physical assessment was completed before and after the 12-week intervention. Results: Wilk’s Lambda Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant (p < 0.05) changes from pre-, mid-, and post- 4.17/1g Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test scores. However, there were no significant (p < 0.05) results detected with the 5.07 Semmes Weinstein Monofilament test. Paired samples ttests revealed significant (p < 0.05) differences between aerobic and several strength tests from pre- to post-assessment. Several psychological scores improved significantly (p < 0.05) as well from pre- to post- assessment. Conclusion: Significant improvements were observed for the 4.17/1g Semmes Weinstein Monofilament test following a 12-week aerobic and strength training intervention for subjects experiencing chemotherapyinduced peripheral neuropathy. These results suggest that aerobic and strength training may contribute to a reduction in chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

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