Advisor

McNeil, Jeannette

Committee Member

Clukey, Lory

Committee Member

Wilson, Vicki

Committee Member

Athanasiou, Michelle

Department

Nursing Education

Institution

University of Northern Colorado

Type of Resources

Text

Place of Publication

Greeley (Colo.)

Publisher

University of Northern Colorado

Date Created

5-2019

Extent

103 pages

Digital Origin

Born digital

Abstract

Mental health stigma hinders quality nursing care. The aim of this quasi-experimental study was to test if simulation was effective for addressing stigma in nursing education and evaluating student attitudes towards psychiatric conditions. A sample of eight-nine undergraduate nursing students were assigned to a control or treatment group and participated in either a chronic health challenge scenario or a mental health scenario to test the effectiveness of using a mental health simulation to address stigmatizing attitudes. Day’s Mental Illness Stigma Scale was used as the data collection tool for the post-test to measure students’ stigmatizing perceptions in relation to their assigned scenario. This scale was completed by the students immediately after the simulation and approximately three months after participating in the simulation scenario to evaluate change in perceptions. Analysis of mean scores revealed that students participating in the mental health scenario demonstrated more stigmatizing attitudes overall except related to the subscale for anxiety toward mental illness, for which the control group showed more stigmatizing attitudes. These findings indicate a need for further research into the use of simulation as an educational approach and the possibility of modifying this approach for effectively addressing mental health stigma.

Degree type

PhD

Degree Name

Doctoral

Local Identifiers

Varaich_unco_0161D_10728

Rights Statement

Copyright is held by the author.

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